Loading…
Now in its 16th year, the Brick & Click Libraries Conference (#bclc16) is a one-day event featuring concurrent and lightning round sessions that explore cutting-edge technologies, practical solutions, and timely topics. The conference supports the academic information needs of both on-ground (brick) and online (click) students, library professionals and paraprofessionals.

The conference is held at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. Registration is limited in order to maintain the advantages of a small conference, so register early!   To register visit: www.brickandclick.org

Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, November 3
 

6:30pm CDT

Pre-Conference Dine-Around: A&G's Restaurant
Limited Capacity seats available

Join us for a casual pre-conference dine-around dinner the evening before the conference. Meet and mingle with other attendees and presenters. Receive your proceedings and conference packet early!

Classic Greek dishes, new-fare, and that extra special touch is exactly what so many have come to know and love about A&G.

Providing steaks that are hand-cut daily, mouthwatering pastas, original pizza, homemade dressings, delectable desserts and enough variety to meet the needs of any appetite, you can truly taste the difference!  

View more than 150 menu items at http://www.agrestaurant.com/.  


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm CDT
A&G Restaurant 208 N. Main Street

6:30pm CDT

Pre-Conference Dine-Around: Carson's Sports Grille
Limited Capacity seats available

Join us for a casual pre-conference dine-around dinner the evening before the conference. Meet and mingle with other attendees and presenters. Receive your proceedings and conference packet early!

This college town sports Grill specializes in pub fare including customizable wraps, sandwiches and appetizers. 

Thursday November 3, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm CDT
Carson's Sports Grille 310 N. Main Street

6:30pm CDT

Pre-Conference Dine-Around: Simply Siam Thai
Limited Capacity filling up

Join us for a casual pre-conference dine-around dinner the evening before the conference. Meet and mingle with other attendees and presenters. Receive your proceedings and conference packet early!

Simply Siam serves authentic Thai food in a soothing, family-friendly environment.  View their menu at http://simplysiam.com/.

Thursday November 3, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm CDT
Simply Siam Thai 314 N. Main Street
 
Friday, November 4
 

8:00am CDT

8:10am CDT

Continental Breakfast (8-9:10 am)
  • Cheddar vegetable strata
  • Three cheese ham strata with red and green pepper
  • breakfast potatoes
  • Greek yogurt with granola and berries
  • breakfast breads (banana, zucchini, pumpkin)
  • French vanilla coffee, regular/decaf coffee, assorted hot teas

Friday November 4, 2016 8:10am - 8:40am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Ballroom

8:40am CDT

9:10am CDT

How to Maintain Reserves Through Departmental Cooperation

At George A. Spiva Library, Missouri Southern State University, reserves items include the materials purchased by the library and faculty members’ personal belongings. All of the physical reserves are shelved behind the main circulation desk for educational purposes. However, a variety of issues have occurred to the reserves because of the cessation of some courses or the leaving and retirement of faculty members. To facilitate the access and availability of the reserves to library patrons, a solution is imperative. The presenters will talk about the practices in reserves that are implemented through the cooperation of the departments of Technical Services and Circulation. The session also includes discussion of creation of a maintenance policy and the cataloging guidelines for reserves, including physical copies and electronic materials. Also covered is the joint workflow for the clean-up of the reserves at the circulation desk and in the ILS, Innovative Interfaces/Sierra.


Moderators
SP

Scott Peterson

Systems Librarian, MOBIUS

Speakers
HL

Hong Li

Electronic Resources and Discovery Librarian, University of Tennessee at Martin (UTM)
avatar for Kayla Reed

Kayla Reed

Systems Librarian, MSSU



Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 10:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room B

9:10am CDT

Mentoring on Mars

How might mentorship help people to thoughtfully adapt to working in highly diverse environments? Must mentor and mentee act, look, speak, and think alike? Successful mentoring is often defined as harmonious. One of the perceived pitfalls of this relationship is how to respond when the two parties see the world in radically different ways. A traditional remedy is to reassign the mentee to what is thought of as a more compatible mentor. Since the goal of mentorship is to assist in professional growth, mutual compatibility should not be underrated. But before rushing to partner like-with-like, it is wise to consider the benefits of both people learning how to forge new pathways to connect with each other. In this way mentoring becomes a learning space allowing both participants room to practice what it is like to work closely with someone who seems so different. Cultivating a working appreciation of diversity is an expression of inclusive excellence and becomes a transferable skill that powerfully affects the mentor and mentee’s other working relationships. The disciplines of management, academic leadership, and social justice advocacy have successfully employed metaphor to unpack and understand culture and behavior when embracing issues of diversity of thought, diversity of opinion, and diversity of culture. The technique used to access these metaphors, called framing, challenges the individual to view institutions, situations, and people through different lenses to come to an understanding of alternate ways of knowing. In this interactive session two librarian supervisors present two fictitious cases informed by their experience and by the professional literature. Through a series of group activities attendees will be challenged to view these sticky, messy, problematic cases from both the mentor and the mentee’s eyes using the framing technique which will be presented to them beforehand. The goal of these group exercises is not to find one right answer, or to seek group consensus. Instead this session will offer attendees a positive, respectful, and practical mechanism for framing people, situations, and environments in radically new ways in order to relate successfully to the seemingly different, the confusing, the scary, the antagonistic, and the strange. The presenters will provide attendees with a handout summarizing the frames and how to use them, and a bibliography of resources for further investigation.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Susan Frey

Susan Frey

Coordinator of Strategic Initiatives, Indiana State University
VM

Valentine Muyumba

Technical Services Chairperson, Indiana State University



Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 10:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

9:10am CDT

Intota Assessment Tool: A Practical Tool for Assessing Library Collections

Librarians have been facing the challenge of effectively managing and accessing library collections. This presentation describes the implementation experience of Intota (a library assessment tool developed by ProQuest) at Missouri Southern State University’s Spiva Library. As an early Intota adopter, the authors provide an overview of the primary implementation tasks in three key stages: project planning and initial setup; usage data harvesting/ingestion for print and electronic collections; and the process of populating Intota’s knowledge base with data related to resource subscription and cost. The process of implementing Intota involves a series of learning and preparation activities. Some activities are easy to complete, while the others have become overwhelming and tedious.

 

The presentation also focuses on how the library utilizes Intota to significantly improve its ERM activities and collection assessment. Examples include streamlining the ERM workflow, consolidating management activities and source data into a central online location, analyzing the library collections based on critical data (e.g., cost per use and peer analysis), and making data-driven decisions involving the acquisition, renewal, and deselection of library resources.

 

The utilization of Intota has benefited the library in a variety of ways: creating an automatic workflow to notify upcoming renewal and license expiration; achieving a certain degree of transparency between siloed job duties and information; providing a range of analyses based on COUNTER reports; etc.

 

The process of implementation creates opportunities for the library staff to review their existing practices, to understand each other’s work and challenges, and to share ideas that can result in the maximization of Intota’s features. The transformed ERM workflow and comprehensive collection analyses through Intota have provided the library with valuable insight and practical solutions to be shared with other institutions.


Moderators
avatar for Randy Roberts

Randy Roberts

Dean of Library Services, Pittsburg State University

Speakers
BB

Bob Black

Serials and Reference Librarian, Missouri Southern State University
XL

Xiaocan (Lucy) Wang

Emerging Technologies & Systems Librarian, Missouri Southern State University


Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 10:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

9:10am CDT

The Big Reveal: LibGuides Analytics and Why They Matter

One of the notable advantages of LibGuides version 2 is the availability of enhanced analytics, which when analyzed thoughtfully, can provide a variety of insights into users' research needs and information-seeking behaviors. Local LibGuides administrators from Saint Louis University will introduce participants to the various kinds of analytics available in LibGuides v2 (Homepage, Guides, Sessions, Browser/Operating System, Searches, and Assets). Using illustrative examples from their own institution's LibGuides analytics, the speakers will discuss what data is available and how it can and should be leveraged to improve LibGuides creation, curation, metadata, and ongoing site management.


Moderators
avatar for Noël Kopriva

Noël Kopriva

Engineering Librarian & Head, Engineering Library & Technology Commons, University of Missouri-Columbia

Speakers
avatar for Jamie L. Emery

Jamie L. Emery

Research & Instruction Librarian / Professor, Saint Louis University
avatar for Sarah Fancher

Sarah Fancher

Research & Instruction Librarian, Saint Louis University



Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 10:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

9:10am CDT

Employing Student in Digitization: Leveraging Digital Projects as Valuable Learning Experiences

Student assistance in conducting small digital projects at Grinnell College has been valuable to the students, the department of Special Collections and Archives, and the Libraries as a whole. Over the course of several recent and ongoing projects, students have been involved in everything from helping to establish a workflow, to choosing the material to scan, to the actual digitization itself. Students are even frequently enthusiastic about publicizing completed projects. By involving students in each step of the projects, Special Collections is provided with much-needed manpower. And the goal is that, in return, students will gain valuable knowledge related to project planning and team coordination, as well as technical and preservation skills and experience. We have found that incorporating students in the earliest stages of a project allows us to help them learn to think in terms of long-range plans, goal setting, and “the Big Picture.” Allowing them to assist in determining what materials can be – or should be – scanned opens up the opportunity to discuss such topics as copyright, intellectual rights, conservation and preservation, and digital preservation. By doing the digitization, students gain experience with current technologies that may be transferable to a future workplace. If you haven’t considered using students in digital projects before, this will be a good venue to explore and discuss this valuable learning experience.


Moderators
avatar for Jessica Vest

Jessica Vest

Archivist, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
CJ

Christopher Jones

Special Collections Librarian and Archivist, Grinnell College



Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 10:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

10:10am CDT

Using Data to Drive Public Services Decisions

Many libraries collect massive amounts of data, but much of that data sits in a spreadsheet, waiting for mandatory reporting, bragging about services, or other reporting. Meanwhile, public service departments make major decisions based on impressions, anecdotes, and past practice. At UMKC Libraries, librarians have been working toward increased evidence-based decision making, and particularly in public services on making decisions about staffing and services based on data. The presenters discuss best practices for collecting data that can inform decisions, the tools and methods they use at UMKC for data collection and analysis, and several examples of how they used this data to make decisions about proposed changes to staffing and services.


Moderators
avatar for Courtney Gard

Courtney Gard

Circulation Specialist, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
avatar for Jen Salvo

Jen Salvo

Head of Resource Sharing, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Jen Salvo is the Head of Resource Sharing and Graduate Student Services at the University of Missouri-Kansas City Libraries; she is also the current chair of the Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative Steering Committee. At UMKC, she and her team process over 30,000 ILL requests annually... Read More →
avatar for Cindy Thompson

Cindy Thompson

Associate Dean, University of Missouri-Kansas City



Friday November 4, 2016 10:10am - 11:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

10:10am CDT

Winning the Steelcase Education Active Learning Center Grant: Strategies for Successful Grant Writing

Learn how a small university’s proposal for the 2016 Steelcase Education Active Learning Center grant beat out 790 other institutions to become one of six higher education institutions to receive the award. This presentation will focus on how to increase your grant writing skills to become a successful grant writer, regardless of institution size. The presenters reflect on the challenges, opportunities, and lessons learned in an engaging and participatory session. Participants will be encouraged and invited to share strategies for successful grant writing, how to engage library staff in the process, and how to reach out to external stakeholders for feedback. Participants will leave the session with a toolkit of strategies for grant finding, planning the grant proposal writing process and timeline, and seeking external reviewers.

www.allsteeloffice.com/products/collaborative/gather-collection/sketch

www.allsteeloffice.com/products/collaborative/gather-collection/rise 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Ashley Creek

Ashley Creek

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Saint Mary
Ashley Creek is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas. Her current research interests focus on the student experience: gamification, makerspaces, active learning, instructional design, and the library as center of the academic community... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Theiss Dion

Danielle Theiss Dion

Library Director, University of Saint Mary
avatar for Lindsay Schettler

Lindsay Schettler

Special Collections and Content Management Librarian, University of Saint Mary



Friday November 4, 2016 10:10am - 11:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

10:10am CDT

Renovating Foundations: Archives Space and Collections Management

Often due to their unique resources, archival repositories operate alongside libraries in providing access to materials. This is true of the Archives & Special Collections at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries. The presenters feature ArchivesSpace as a collection management tool that provides access to primary source materials. Collection management is an essential component of the discovery process for archive patrons and of equal importance to repository staff who serve multiple constituencies. Specifically, the presenters will discuss the implementation of ArchivesSpace and standards associated with description and metadata that lead to access and use of primary source materials, including documents, photographs, born-digital materials, and associated resources. Archival collection management tools operate similarly to a library catalog for public access, however, they also provide essential information for describing, housing, locating, and managing archival collections.  As an open access program, ArchivesSpace allows customization and the presenters will show how changes made to the installation aligns it to their repository needs. They will also discuss reliance on metadata development, migration, and development of processes to enhance use, understanding, and interoperability for all formats of materials.


Moderators
avatar for Randy Roberts

Randy Roberts

Dean of Library Services, Pittsburg State University

Speakers
avatar for Peterson Brink

Peterson Brink

Assistant Archivist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
avatar for Mary Ellen Ducey

Mary Ellen Ducey

University Archivist & Special Collections Librarian, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Mary Ellen Ducey serves at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln Libraries as the University Archivist & Special Collections Librarian. As an associate professor in this role, she supports research and scholarship relating to archival collections, including the exploration of resources... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 10:10am - 11:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

10:10am CDT

Catch Online Students by Design

In higher education, more online courses and programs are taught every year. It is a challenge for academic librarians to engage with and connect with the online student. Not only is the classroom in an online setting but the students might not even live near the physical campus. The presenters will discuss multiple strategies that librarians have used to engage and interact with students that enriches their learning experience. They will describe approaches for designing course interaction, email strategies, check in methods, and ways that grab the students’ attention. Session attendees will leave with several methods for engaging students in the online environment in a way that will enhance their learning. The paper will also include specific methods that can be customized.


Moderators
avatar for Beth Caldarello

Beth Caldarello

Director of Library Services, North Central Missouri College

Speakers
JM

Jean Marshall

Instruction Librarian, Washburn University
GW

Gwen Wilson

Health Informatics Coordinator/Librarian, Washburn University



Friday November 4, 2016 10:10am - 11:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

10:10am CDT

Singing a Different Tune: Moving the Traditional Cataloging Skill Set into non-MARC

K-State Libraries’ Metadata, Preservation & Digital Initiatives department historically has not had an operational workflow that combines aspects of copy, original and non-MARC cataloging. The main reason for this is that non-MARC cataloging is project-based not operational, meaning there is a beginning and end date. Copy and original cataloging on the other hand is mostly operational, meaning it is ongoing work that has no set end date. So the question is how can librarians combine these two very distinct types of workflows to create another type of operational workflow that can be added to the staff’s regular duties without taking time away from their primary responsibilities? The answer is a hybrid workflow that merges aspects of copy, original and non-MARC cataloging that is flexible enough to be adapted to different materials, mainly primary resource from special collections and university archives that might come through this operational/project-based workflow. This workflow would only be utilized by staff when they have time, need a break from their regular duties, and/or when there is down time when staff cannot do their regular duties. The first type of materials to go through this workflow were handwritten theses, 1896 to 1925, from special collections and archives that had not been cataloged. The presenter will use this experience to demonstrate the different phases of the workflow, and how it provides access and information to more primary resources for students and faculty.


Moderators
avatar for Brandy Brady

Brandy Brady

Asst. Library Director, Collection Development, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
AH

Amanda Harlan

Metadata Librarian, Kansas State University



Friday November 4, 2016 10:10am - 11:00am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room B

11:10am CDT

"I Got My Customer Service Badge!": Using Online Modules for Library Student Worker Training

Training student workers well, face-to-face, using active learning techniques and elements of fun, is exhausting, time-consuming, and has to be repeated at least every year if you are lucky, and every semester if you are not. Every academic library wants student workers who are productive, provide exemplary customer service, and make our professional lives easier. Almost every student worker wants a way to make money in between his or her classes without leaving campus. Working in the library should be a match made in heaven, but often the logistical challenges of scheduling, consistency, and complexity lead to repeated content for returning students, gaps in training, and a need for more one-on-one training throughout the student’s term of employment. Using free online tools, LibGuides, and scaffolded content, a librarian at a small private university created a new system for training student workers using online modules with quizzes and small projects to certify satisfactory completion. These use-and-reuse modules allow students to learn at their own pace, avoid unnecessary replication of content, and provide a measure of skills that can be easily tracked for reference letters, LinkedIn endorsements, and internal employee recognition programs. This session will explore active learning techniques to create memorable and effective online training modules, free or commonly available tools to streamline content creation and training assessment, and the challenges and rewards throughout the process.


Moderators
avatar for Melissa Mallon

Melissa Mallon

Director of Peabody Library/Director of Teaching & Learning, Vanderbilt University

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Creek

Ashley Creek

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Saint Mary
Ashley Creek is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas. Her current research interests focus on the student experience: gamification, makerspaces, active learning, instructional design, and the library as center of the academic community... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:10am - 12:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

11:10am CDT

Library Space and Usage Studies Can Inform, Influence & Impact Our Buildings and Services

As information resources in academic libraries continue to become more digital and less physical in format, library space can be seen as valuable real estate that might be better used for other purposes. Some faculty and administrators might assume that the library building (or book stacks) is no longer needed if less physical resources are purchased. Library administrators need to be able to demonstrate their department’s impact and value to the education process.  An initial step in this assessment process is conducting space and usage studies. Rowan University’s Campbell Library has conducted space and usage studies for five semesters. The results have informed the library administrators which in turned helped influence decisions that impacted building renovations and services as well as the image of the library.


Moderators
avatar for Terra Feick

Terra Feick

Assistant Library Director, Access Services, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
SF

Susan Fink

Director of Technical Services, Facilites & Business Administration, Rowan University


Friday November 4, 2016 11:10am - 12:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

11:10am CDT

Establishing an Electronic Thesis Repository Using Digital Commons

Has your institution mandated an Institutional Repository for electronic theses? Do you feel intimidated with setting up an institutional repository? The presenters share their success and experience of working with the graduate school at two small universities in rural Kansas to establish an electronic thesis program.

 

The repository serves as an Open Access solution to globally share. Both Pittsburg State University (PSU) and Fort Hays State University (FHSU) currently use CONTENTdm (CDM) as their primary digital repository. In 2015, both PSU and FHSU purchased and launched BePress Digital Commons (DC), a more robust repository. If you see global discoverability, unlimited storage, efficient technical support, and the ability to share a wide range of file formats in one interface, then Digital Commons by BePress is the most reliable.

 

The presenters discuss the experiences and challenges of adapting and implementing the IR at PSU and FHSU, comparing and contrasting advantages and disadvantages of the two platforms. Finally, they’ll share the challenges associated with IR initiatives at PSU and FHSU including marketing, workflows, and collection development. 


Moderators
avatar for Jessica Vest

Jessica Vest

Archivist, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
avatar for Yumi Ohira

Yumi Ohira

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Nebraska at Omaha
DW

Deborah White

Digital Resources and Initiatives Manager, Pittsburg State University



Friday November 4, 2016 11:10am - 12:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room B

11:10am CDT

Make it Beautiful, Make it Usable: DIY Design for Libraries

Sometimes your learning content is conceptually sound but in need of a facelift - we can guide you through that process to avoid a Joan Rivers outcome. This workshop will focus on adapting existing ideas, learning materials, lesson plans, presentations, and learning activities into more beautiful, usable content.

 

What to bring:

- Something you’d like to reinvent - a worksheet, a PowerPoint presentation, an interactive tutorial, a video, a LibGuide.

- Your portable technology - laptop, tablet, pocket holodeck, etc.

- And fill out this tiny survey now, please and thank you! https://goo.gl/forms/OQ5Wwzhfm9pCMwC53

 

What you’ll walk away with:

-A transformed learning object, ready for deployment in your instruction or programming.

-A portfolio of recommended tools for design and learning object creation.

-Confidence that the new look is red carpet-ready. Even Joan will agree.

 


Moderators
avatar for Beth Caldarello

Beth Caldarello

Director of Library Services, North Central Missouri College

Speakers
avatar for Dani Wellemeyer

Dani Wellemeyer

Head of Outreach and Engagement, University of Missouri Kansas City
avatar for Jess Williams

Jess Williams

Outreach & Engagement Librarian, UMKC
Let's talk about open education and life hacking!



Friday November 4, 2016 11:10am - 12:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

11:11am CDT

Lightning Round: Implementing a Smartphone Scavenger Hunt at Mizzou Libraries

In the Fall Semester of 2015, the University of Missouri-Columbia Libraries (MU Libraries) Instruction Committee began offering students in first-year classes a web-based, smartphone-friendly library scavenger hunt as an alternative to traditional library tours. With time and budget constraints in mind, librarians used resources already available, Qualtrics software and Springshare Research Guides, to create and deliver the MU Libraries Scavenger Hunt. This paper will share how librarians adopted the guidelines in UC San Diego’s presentation (Goldman and Rhodes, 2015) to suit MU Libraries’ needs, challenges that occurred along the way, how the scavenger hunt was marketed and promoted, and a collage made from student work during the scavenger hunt. 


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
KM

Kimberly Moeller

Instructional Services Librarian, University of Missouri Libraires


Friday November 4, 2016 11:11am - 11:21am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

11:21am CDT

Lightning Round: Building Instructional Labs for Tomorrow: Do Trees and Tablets Work?

At a time when primary and secondary schools are planning and expending tens of millions of dollars on new facilities and technology – first graders doing digital portfolios in schools where young learners use tablets, and ēno and interactive white boards rule in a wireless environment – why are many academic libraries hesitant to be ready as these young learners prepare to enter college? In the 2 ½ years since it opened, the NHTI Instructional Lab - based on Biophilic Design, collaborative learning and tablet technology - remains in the forefront of innovative Instructional Lab design with an impressive track record of unparalleled instructional success: it has become the place to be on campus. Now, with several years of experience to interpret, this presentation examines why the Instructional Lab is so successful and what it means to student success, information literacy, secondary school partnerships, careers and technology preparedness even as the Instructional Lab helps make the student transition to college seamless. The future is now: to sit on the sidelines and not to embrace the new technology – not to prepare for the arrival of young learners - is a recipe for failure. Here’s how disaster can be avoided and success achieved.


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
SA

Stephen Ambra

Library Director, NHTI Concord’s Community College


Friday November 4, 2016 11:21am - 11:31am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

11:31am CDT

Lightning Round: Creating Without Crunching: Library Interactive Map

In the past few decades, library print resources and human face-to-face services have declined. This is evident as most interaction with the library occurs online, thanks to chat reference, eBooks, online articles/discovery services, decline in the budget for print materials, etc. It is also evident from most of our libraries that books take up more than fifty percent of the library space. A common way of raising awareness about these books has been by the displaying books at strategic places within the walls of the library. As the footprint in library websites and online services increases, creating an interactive map of the library floor map, showing the location books with respect to their subject areas seems to be a good idea. An interactive map may contain some of the following: text, images, links, videos, categories, etc. This sounds great but its development and creation may not be an easy task to undertake. The presenter used an affordable low-cost software to painlessly create an interactive map for the Harriett K. Hutchens Library at the Southwest Baptist Universities Libraries. The presentation showcases the interactive map, its development, benefits, and usability studies.


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Doyin Adenuga

Doyin Adenuga

Electronic Resources Librarian, Houghton College



Friday November 4, 2016 11:31am - 11:41am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

11:41am CDT

Lightning Round: Innovating and Building New Things with Our Student Workers

The student workers have always been part of academic libraries doing myriad of tasks. Most of them are hired to shelve returned books, check out library material, help users at the information desk, and many other chores necessary to keep a library running. However, students can also be of great help in more specialized tasks that align with their school curriculum by providing them a real-life learning experience At the University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Law, librarians initiated a new experiment in which they hired students from the computer science department to help develop mobile and web applications that benefit not only the law library but also the law school and the entire university. The students work on various projects designed to solve existing problems such as a library mobile application and a room schedule display system. The students also get to work on experimental projects such as a short story dispenser and close proximity notification system.

In this presentation, the speaker shares the initial results of this on-going experiment as well as some tips for libraries interested in initiating similar programs. 


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Ayyoub Ajmi

Ayyoub Ajmi

Digital Communications and Learning Initiatives Librarian, The University of Missouri-Kansas City
Ayyoub Ajmi is a digital communications and learning initiatives librarian at the UMKC School of Law. He is building and managing an integral digital communications platform, which provides access to the law school's library and its digital resources, supports law faculty members... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:41am - 11:51am CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

12:00pm CDT

Lunch
Door Prizes at 12:30 p.m.

Salads:

  • Traditional garden salad
  • Red-skinned potato salad with egg, celery and Spanish onion in a seasoned mayonnaise dressing

 Sandwiches:

  • Cashew chicken ciabatta with fresh romaine and red grapes
  • Chicken teriyaki with pineapple salsa wrap
  • Turkey & ham club sub with bacon, swiss cheese and honey Dijon dressing
  • Vegetarian choice: Ciabatta, hummus, feta, cucumber, olive, spinach
Soups:
  • Chili
  • Lentil (gluten-free, vegetarian, and lactose-free)

Desserts:

  • Pumpkin bars
  • Frosted Brownies
Coffee & Iced Tea  

Friday November 4, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Ballroom

1:00pm CDT

"But We've Always Done it this Way!": Managing Expectations of Blended Workforces

The current workforce of librarians represents, perhaps, the greatest differences in experiences, skills, ability, and tattoo frequency than at any point in the history of librarianship. It is these many differences that make the current librarian workforce both extremely diverse and, arguably, more effective than it has ever been. The challenge for managers is how to foster these groups of librarians who may have extremely different areas of expertise and allow them to function in a way that benefits the librarians, the library, and most importantly, the users.

 

New librarians are wonderful additions to any library. They bring excitement, skills, and enthusiasm to their new libraries. This enthusiasm can often be met with frustration from those that have “put in their time” or librarians that have been met with resistance from their administration. At the same time, more experienced librarians may feel that newcomers do not appropriately respect institutional history or practice. As managers, it is important to realize that the best path forward is to help all library staff recognize their similarities and shared goals, regardless of years in the profession. This session will focus on bringing together diverse populations of librarians while providing both managers and library staff with key strategies for making the most out of their staff’s distinct skill sets and perspectives.


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Mallon

Melissa Mallon

Director of Peabody Library/Director of Teaching & Learning, Vanderbilt University
NW

Nicholas Wyant

Head, Social Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington



Friday November 4, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

1:00pm CDT

Becoming the DH...Digital Humanities, Public History, and the Library

With traditional roles of librarians changing, Pickler Memorial Library has invested in building support for digital humanities projects…striving to become a resource of academic and technical expertise for Truman State University’s faculty, staff and students. 

 

A pilot project for this initiative began in Fall 2014, when a history faculty member approached the Special Collections department to ask about potential collaborative projects that would support the Harry H. Laughlin Eugenics Collection.  Taking into consideration the goals of collection support, faculty collaboration, and building a student’s digital fluency skills, the library agreed to support the construction of a digital exhibit as part of the course.

 

This idea evolved to become a cross-departmental initiative which included various campus areas: Library Reference Services, Special Collections and Archives, the ITS Learning Technologies Team, and the History department.  With this initiative, the library not only provided traditional research support but expanded their role to become collaborators in course design, digital humanities, and digital fluency development.


Moderators
avatar for Jessica Vest

Jessica Vest

Archivist, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
AL

Amanda Langendoerfer

Associate Dean of Libraries, Truman State University
avatar for Janet Romine

Janet Romine

Head of Public Services, Pickler Memorial Library, Truman State University



Friday November 4, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

1:00pm CDT

Creating a Technology Sandbox in an Academic Library

The Beulah Williams is currently working on creating a space for future teachers to have access to new and emerging technologies that are or possibility will be in the classroom once they become professional teachers. The presentation includes a review of literature to show the trends currently in place in academic libraries for technology sandboxes/ makerspaces and will discuss why these spaces are successful in academic libraries. The presenters discuss steps taken by the Library Director and the Electronic Resources Manager to obtain the necessary equipment, and how they gained the support needed from the university community. The presentation concludes with plans for the future of the technology space at both the university level and within the Aberdeen, South Dakota Community as an outreach endeavor.


Moderators
avatar for Ashley Creek

Ashley Creek

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Saint Mary
Ashley Creek is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas. Her current research interests focus on the student experience: gamification, makerspaces, active learning, instructional design, and the library as center of the academic community... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lynn Klundt

Lynn Klundt

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Northern State University Beulah Williams Library



Friday November 4, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

1:01pm CDT

Lightning Round: Confident Shifting for Complex Moves

As long as librarians have been collecting books they have been shifting books. This paper explains how before a single book is ever moved librarians can know where each book should belong after a shift. This method allows you to leave more space for some sections of your collection than others. The method also works if you change the number of shelves in the collection. You can specify growth space on certain parts of the collection while letting math formulas dynamically determine the amount of books allocated to the rest of the shelves. While all of this could be done with paper and pencil, the author links to a spreadsheet example that makes parts of the process easier.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Joshua Lambert

Joshua Lambert

Head of Access Services, Missouri State University Libraries



Friday November 4, 2016 1:01pm - 1:11pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

1:11pm CDT

Lightning Round: Keeping the Baby AND the Bathwater: Supplementing Traditional ILL with an On-Demand Document Delivery Service

This case study examines one university’s implementation of Copyright Clearance Center’s “Get It Now” rapid document delivery program to augment traditional Interlibrary Loan Service. Get It Now supplements traditional library journal collections by providing rapid on-request electronic access to a deep body of journal literature, for a per article charge which is absorbed by the library. This University’s pilot project provided the service to all constituencies within our university community: undergraduate, graduate student, staff and faculty. This differs from many implementations which are limited to certain populations e.g. faculty-only. With a full year of data, this university has assessed whether this broad availability of service is sustainable financially with current resources; whether it makes sense from a collections development standpoint; who the major users are when the service is available to all; and in what subject areas the requested articles predominate. This session will present a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional ILL and commercial document delivery services and present background data about the institution, the empirical data used to monitor the levels of usage, user demographics, and cost-effectiveness. This data will assist those from other institutions in anticipating the possible outcomes of implementing similar programs.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Rob O'Brien Withers

Rob O'Brien Withers

Access Services Librarian, Miami University
I've worked in varying sizes of academic libraries (ranging from college to ARL) and in various types of positions (access services, technical services, web development, and a 10 year run as Assistant to the Dean. I've never found a library position that I didn't like. For the past... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 1:11pm - 1:21pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

1:21pm CDT

Lightning Round: Picking Favorites: Setting Up a Study Room Reservation System

McGoogan Library of medicine launched a self-service reservation system for open study rooms in Spring 2016 to address the issues in the previous room key-check-out system. The 16 study rooms have always been a hot commodity for students. In the previous system, students would request their favorite room, check out the key for up to 8 hours, and then leave the library to grab food or head to a lab, which left the rooms empty but unusable by anyone else. Unfulfilled requests for room keys were tracked by Circulation Services. Under the suggestion of our library director, representatives from Circulation Services, Systems and Collection  Development explored options to make the rooms more available for all students, and chose D!BS, an online reservation system. The Library anticipates the launch of D!BS to better track room usage and lead to overall user satisfaction. This presentation will discuss the steps taken to launch the self-service study room reservation system from choosing a platform, to training staff, to marketing, and finally responses from the McGoogan Library patrons.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Alissa Fial

Alissa Fial

Education & Research Services Librarian, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center



Friday November 4, 2016 1:21pm - 1:31pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

1:31pm CDT

Lightning Round: Lost in the Stacks: Helping Undergraduate Students Navigate the Library Labyrinth

Wayfinding, a term when used in the context of architecture, refers to the individual’s experience of orienting and choosing a path within a physical space. Reconsidering the existing academic library space through the concept of wayfinding is a means to improve undergraduate students’ ability to not only navigate the library space, but also locate the resources and services they need. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaborative wayfinding project between a librarian and an undergraduate design class at the University of Kansas Art and Architecture Library. Rather than conduct a more traditional library orientation session, the librarian turned a request for instruction into an opportunity to use students’ classroom knowledge to teach them information literacy and improve their library. The librarian and the public services staff hoped to use the wayfinding method to eliminate two main obstacles for successful use of the library:  difficulty locating materials on the shelf and the need to ask directional questions. The session will highlight the students’ suggestions, benefits, challenges, and outcomes of the project. By collaborating with the undergraduate design students, the library staff will ensure that the library environment is reflective of the physical information seeking behaviors of undergraduates in the arts while also teaching the student participants about the resources and services of the library.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Andi Back

Andi Back

Fine Arts and Humanities Librarian, University of Kansas


Friday November 4, 2016 1:31pm - 1:41pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

2:00pm CDT

Developing a Research Proposal: Serendipity and Planning

The Health Sciences Library Network of Kansas City, Inc. (HSLNKC), is an active organization. Two years ago three of the academic health sciences libraries within HSLNKC (University of Missouri Kansas City Health Sciences and Dental Libraries, Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, and University of Kansas Medical Center-Dykes Library) collaborated to find a student focused topic we could universally participate in. After discussing several ideas, the one that rose to the top was space utilization.

 

All three libraries struggle with what type of study spaces to offer and how much of each kind, so a survey instrument was developed to study how our students were presently using the spaces in each of the libraries. The presenters communicated with each other concerning the details of the survey, where to record the data, and the information that needed to be gathered from the Institutional Review Board for human subject research from each of the three institutions. Join them to learn about setting up a survey, deciding where to record data, dealing with multiple Institutional Review Boards for human subject research, and more.


Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Johnson

Carolyn Johnson

Research and Outreach Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University
Systems for student success, information literacy, collection development, library outreach activities, teaching, best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Sykes Berry

Susan Sykes Berry

Curator of Publish Materials, UMKC Health Sciences Library
MJ

Marilyn J. De Geus

Library Director, Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences D'Angelo Library
SM

Sarah M. Kartsonis

User Services Manager, The University of Kansas Medical Center-A.R. Dykes Library, Content and Access



Friday November 4, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room B

2:00pm CDT

Keeping in Step with the College's Mission

Strategic planning is not so much about what to do with all the funding that you have, but more about commitment to a plan for excellence – no matter what that means for your library. A strategic plan envisions the future, develops the methods needed to move to that future, establishes priorities, and tells others your core functions and services. It is a key management tool but one that is not often implemented because it sounds scary, it sounds like too much work, and people simply don’t understand what a good plan can do for an organization.

 

One of the first things you have to decide is what do you hope to gain by going through a strategic planning process. There are many avenues available to take on that road to excellence – that’s why each library’s plan is going to be different.  Once a strategic plan is in place, it is there to provide frameworks for decision-making, shared understanding, and priority-setting. 

 

There are many advantages to a strategic plan and the presenter will discuss the ways that a strategic plan provided priorities, goals, objectives to meet the goals, activities to meet the objectives, and deliverables to demonstrate the accomplishment of the objectives. 

 

The library employees have worked many years with individual goal-setting for each semester and one of the things that will be discussed is the difference in goal-setting with and without a strategic plan. While some aspects of creating a strategic plan will be inevitably touched upon in this presentation that is not the primary focus. The primary focus is how their strategic plan finally drove accomplishment and completion of projects that had formerly been attempted but not completed. In addition, the presenter will talk about how their organizational culture was improved through the use of their strategic plan.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Joyce Meldrem

Joyce Meldrem

Library Director, Loras College



Friday November 4, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

2:00pm CDT

2015 Summer of Changes: Reducing Print Collection, New ILS, and Redesigning Space at Dibner Library of Science and Technology

Dibner Library is an academic engineering library supporting the teaching and research needs of the faculty and student body of NYU Tandon School of Engineering formerly known as Polytechnic University (Poly). The schools, New York University and Poly, officially merged in 2014. This union served as a catalyst for reinventing Dibner, a much needed and long overdue process. Like many engineering libraries we were struggling with an inadequate, outdated print collection, lack of user space and online discoverability issues. Soon after the merger library was expected to make drastic changes in a short period to enhance user experience. In a year’s time the Dibner staff (5 librarians, 1 technology specialist, 2 managers and a team of student workers) completed the mission of reducing print by 84% (from 120,000 vols. to 20,000 vols.), migrating MARC records for the remaining collection and redesigning study space. It was a logistic balancing act involving management of personnel (faculty, catalogers, subject specialists, movers, staff, etc.), time-constrained processes, training/disseminating information, and financial constraints. The presenter’s experience, especially in the way of expected and unexpected outcomes, and future plans for growth, may be of some interest to others in a similar situation.


Moderators
avatar for Natasha Young

Natasha Young

Acquisitions, Research Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
GP

Gavin Paul

Instructional & User Services Librarian, NYU Tandon School of Engineering
avatar for Ana Torres

Ana Torres

Assistant Head of Dibner Library, NYU Tandon School of Engineering



Friday November 4, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

2:00pm CDT

Celebrating International Students in the Library

The number of international students attending US universities has jumped 10% in 2015 to reach a total number of 975,000 students. As of 2014, students identified as non-residents or international students at the University of Missouri – Kansas City reached 11% of the total enrollment, representing 79 countries. However, academic libraries have not adjusted their services to meet the increasing needs of their changing populations. The service for international students in academic libraries remains under-developed for many reasons. At UMKC Libraries the presenters decided to reach this segment of the population by celebrating the diversity of their students and promoting the library as a friendly and scholarly hub for international students living away from their family and friends, and for whom the library has become a refuge and place for socializing and studying. The International Students’ Day at the library features educational and entertainment activities prepared in collaboration with the student organizations. Speakers will share tips and lessons learned from activities such as planning, funding, identifying and securing speakers, collaborating with students, marketing, and other aspects of the event. 


Moderators
avatar for Brandy Brady

Brandy Brady

Asst. Library Director, Collection Development, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
avatar for Ayyoub Ajmi

Ayyoub Ajmi

Digital Communications and Learning Initiatives Librarian, The University of Missouri-Kansas City
Ayyoub Ajmi is a digital communications and learning initiatives librarian at the UMKC School of Law. He is building and managing an integral digital communications platform, which provides access to the law school's library and its digital resources, supports law faculty members... Read More →
avatar for Gloria Tibbs

Gloria Tibbs

Organizational Development Coordinator, University of Missouri, Kansas City
For nearly 25 years, Gloria Tibbs has served her community by working as a librarian, first in public libraries and now in academia. Currently she is the Organizational Development Coordinator at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where she has been since 2001, Additionally... Read More →
FZ

Fu Zhuo

Teaching & Learning Librarian, University of Missouri - Kansas City


Friday November 4, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

2:00pm CDT

Making Effective, Usable Research Guides

Designing research guides has recently become an expectation of a large number of librarians. For many of these librarians, creating a guide is their first experience developing content on the Internet. LibGuides, the most popular research guide platform, has many options for changing the navigation and structure of a guide--pages, columns, boxes, tabs, sidebars, and more. These are some of first aspects of LibGuides that librarians encounter. As such, they tend to dominate much of librarians’ thinking about research guides. Indeed, the majority of literature on research guides focuses on navigation and the naming and arrangement of various types of content within a guide. What is often forgotten is a thoughtful consideration of the way content is structured within various pages and boxes within a guide. Navigation is important, but it is only one part of the equation.  

The average web user spends about three seconds on a web page before deciding if it is relevant. If she can’t tell the page is relevant within that window, she leaves. Guides must make their purpose and contents clear very quickly and allow for easy, rapid scanning through the page body. These principles impact every aspect of the page, from top to bottom: navigation, headings, paragraphs, lists, page layout, and page length.


Moderators
avatar for Melissa Mallon

Melissa Mallon

Director of Peabody Library/Director of Teaching & Learning, Vanderbilt University

Speakers
avatar for Josh Welker

Josh Welker

Library Systems and Discovery Coordinator, University of Central Missouri
Let's talk about coding, web usability, sci fi, PC gaming, Aristotle, Heidegger, geography, being awkward, dachsunds, having a 3-year-old, and how to get spaghetti sauce stains off of ties (please help me).



Friday November 4, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom

2:50pm CDT

Networking Break
Snacks:
  • Trail mix (M&Ms, Pretzels, Peanuts, and Raisins) 
  • Caramel chocolate drizzle
  • Fruit
  • Regular, decaf and vanilla coffee
  • Iced water and iced tea

Friday November 4, 2016 2:50pm - 3:10pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Ballroom

3:10pm CDT

Snap, Click, Chat: Investigating the International Student Experience

Like many universities in the United States, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) has experienced a large increase of the international student population in recent years. In response, the University community including librarians, professors, and administrators saw an opportunity to reach out to international students to meet their academic needs. In order to accomplish this, two librarians in collaboration with various campus units at SIUE began a research study to explore international students’ university and library experiences.

 

Initially, librarians reviewed a body of literature regarding international students and the library. Many of the articles focused on specific challenges that international students often face, such as English language skills, plagiarism, acculturation, and bibliographic instruction. Other studies such as those by Allen, Jackson, and Wang attempted to understand international student needs on a broader level, but only employed a survey method. In order to understand the international student population at SIUE from a broad perspective, this study employs a mixed-methods approach using a survey, photo diaries, and in-depth interviews. The researchers will share their research methods, means of data analysis, and their interpretation of the findings.


Moderators
avatar for Adrianna Bennett

Adrianna Bennett

Circulation Specialist, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Burel

Melissa Burel

Catalog Librarian, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
avatar for Sarah Park

Sarah Park

Technology & Engineering Librarian, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Sarah Park is the Technology and Engineering Librarian at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Park manages and develops applications supporting the library’s digital services. Park received her M.S. in Library and Information Science at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:10pm - 4:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room D

3:10pm CDT

Becoming the Center: Creating and Implementing a Unified Service Point

Until 2015, South Caroliniana Library traditionally offered services by division. Published Materials division occupied its own space in the library and provided reference, reproduction service, and interlibrary loan service only for patrons using Published Materials. Manuscripts, Visual Materials, University Archives, and Oral History divisions each operated accordingly. As the library’s collection grew and patronage increased, this model became outdated and inefficient. Patrons would visit one division and then another for the same services, depending on the material they worked with. Library administration determined that creating a unified service model would free up the curators responsible for each division and provide a streamlined model for patrons. As the literature shows, stakeholders often raise practical and emotional concerns during these changes; and the literature also demonstrates that appropriate planning allows for a balanced and effective transition. In this presentation, the author reviews relevant academic literature related to changes in user services models for special collections and other academic libraries, as well as challenges stemming from renovations in special collections and academic libraries. The author also details why and how he assumed responsibility for designing and implementing the single-point reference service for the library. These responsibilities included staffing the desk, creating new procedures and policies for reference, and evaluating the effectiveness of public services in general. Additionally, as the university and library administrations decided to begin a multi-phase renovation initiative that removed all material from the library in 2015, the author provided administrative support to a team that designed and implemented a retrieval system to bring offsite material into the library for patron use. Consequently, the author discusses and elaborates on the processes involved in leading and working with a team of staff, curators, and systems librarians to develop policies and procedures to track material as it worked through the delivery system. 


Moderators
avatar for Garland George

Garland George

Cataloger, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
MB

Michael Berry

Curator of Publish Materials, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC


Friday November 4, 2016 3:10pm - 4:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room A

3:10pm CDT

Extreme Makeover: Information Literacy Edition

Using the model for instruction developed from a popular information literacy librarian, William Badke, the presenters developed a 7-week course that encourages students to follow the natural trajectory of inquiry, using topics that either double as research for other classes, or interest them in a more personal way. By mapping the course sections onto ACRL frameworks, the presenters were able to ensure they met those standards for excellence, utilizing Kagan active learning structures and the game-based learning platform Kahoot, thereby developing a course that encouraged active participation and critical thinking about Information Literacy.

 

The course from the previous semester served as a template for the new course, developed by a graduate student doing her practicum in Information Literacy Instruction. With the help and guidance of the College's Information Literacy Librarian, she was able to gain experience in the field. The new course radically changed the tone of instruction, emphasizing humor and slang over organization and clarity, and the pros and cons of such an approach are discussed.

 

This session will be useful for any instruction librarians wishing to update their existing programs or developing new courses from scratch. The session also demonstrates the effectiveness of a practicum in one's library education. 


Moderators
avatar for Susie M Arvidson

Susie M Arvidson

Director of Library Services, Fort Scott Community College

Speakers
avatar for Abigail  Broadbent

Abigail Broadbent

Practicum Student, William Jewell College
avatar for Rebecca Hamlett

Rebecca Hamlett

Library Director, William Jewell College


Friday November 4, 2016 3:10pm - 4:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Tower View Dining Room

3:10pm CDT

Taking the ILS for a Walk on the Quad: Cross-Campus Collaboration for Tech Services

It’s normal in academic libraries to have public services librarians engaged in projects that have them working closely with faculty and staff from departments across the university. This raises and solidifies the profile of the library within the university community, which in turn can help justify the library budget—an ongoing task in the best of times. Technical services librarians have a role to play in this important relationship-building as well, and can greatly contribute to the university community as a whole by assisting other departments through the skills in which librarians specialize: organization, findability, and access. At Maryville University and the University of Central Oklahoma, two librarians have been engaged in cross-campus collaborations with their respective student involvement offices to allow them access to the libraries’ Integrated Library Systems in order to catalog and circulate the items in their collections. In addition, the Maryville University library has worked on a similar project with their Art & Design program. Topics covered include: benefits to the library and other departments; challenges of “translating” an ILS and its functions; and some particulars of challenges based on the two libraries’ systems (MOBIUS and Sierra on the one hand, and Alma on the other).


Moderators
avatar for Terra Feick

Terra Feick

Assistant Library Director, Access Services, Northwest Missouri State University

Speakers
avatar for Kirsten Davis

Kirsten Davis

Application Administrator, University of Central Oklahoma
avatar for Mary Ann Mercante

Mary Ann Mercante

Assistant Dean & Head, Technical Services, Maryville University
Mary Ann Mercante has been at Maryville University Library since 1993. Prior to that, she served for ten years as the Executive Director of the Missouri Library Network Corporation (MLNC) providing OCLC and other resource-sharing services to Missouri libraries. She began her Library... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:10pm - 4:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Room B

3:10pm CDT

Pop-up Usability Testing - More Data, Less Time (and Money)

Library websites are notoriously hard to design. Librarians strive to build effective websites that serve a variety of users but we must blend original, local content with third party tools and interfaces. Standard usability testing helps us design effective sites, but it is costly, time consuming and laborious. In this session, you will learn how to perform a streamlined version of usability testing, allowing rapid iterations of your site designs. Whether you are tweaking your present site or creating a new one, this testing method can be planned, executed and the results reported in days or maybe even hours. Using real world examples, this session will give attendees the tools and hands on experience needed to perform “Pop-up” testing methods in their libraries. Using this process, you will save time, work and money!


Moderators
avatar for Ashley Creek

Ashley Creek

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Saint Mary
Ashley Creek is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas. Her current research interests focus on the student experience: gamification, makerspaces, active learning, instructional design, and the library as center of the academic community... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kelley Martin

Kelley Martin

Outcomes and Assessment Librarian, University of Missouri - Kansas City
I'm really interested in how our users perform research and they use both the physical library and online content. How can we make their work easier without dumbing down research and, in the process, make them information literate? What new technologies are they using? What older... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:10pm - 4:00pm CDT
J.W. Jones Student Union, Boardroom